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Farley Granger Biography, Net Worth,Age, Rope and Obituary.

Farley Granger Biography

Farley Earle Granger Jr. was an American actor, best known for his two collaborations with director Alfred Hitchcock: Rope in 1948 and Strangers on a Train in 1951.

Granger was first noticed in a small stage production in Hollywood by a Goldwyn casting director and given a significant role in The North Star, a controversial film praising the Soviet Union at the height of World War II, but later condemned for its political bias.

Another war film, The Purple Heart, followed, before Granger’s naval service in Honolulu, in a unit that arranged troop entertainment in the Pacific. Here he made useful contacts, including Bob Hope, Betty Grable, and Rita Hayworth. It was also where he began exploring his bisexuality, which he said he never felt any need to conceal.

Farley Granger Net Worth

Granger’s estimated 2017 and 2018 income` earnings` and salary come to a total of Under Review.

Farley Granger Age

Granger was born on July 1, 1925, and died on March 27, 2011.

Farley Granger Rope

Two brilliant young aesthetes, Brandon Shaw (Dall) and Phillip Morgan (Granger), strangle to death their former classmate from Harvard University, David Kentley (Dick Hogan), in their Manhattan penthouse apartment. They commit the crime as an intellectual exercise: they want to prove their superiority by committing the “perfect murder”.

After hiding the body in a large antique wooden chest, Brandon and Phillip host a dinner party at the apartment, which has a panoramic view of Manhattan’s skyline. The guests, who are unaware of what has happened, include the victim’s father, Mr. Kentley (Cedric Hardwicke), and aunt, Mrs. Atwater (Constance Collier); his mother is unable to attend because of a cold. Also present are his fiancée, Janet Walker (Joan Chandler), and her former lover, Kenneth Lawrence (Douglas Dick), who was once David’s close friend.

James Stewart in the film’s trailer
Brandon uses the chest containing the body as a buffet table for the food, just before their housekeeper, Mrs. Wilson (Edith Evanson), arrives to help with the party.

Brandon and Phillip’s idea for the murder was inspired years earlier by conversations with their prep-school housemaster, publisher Rupert Cadell (Stewart). While they were at school, Rupert had discussed with them, in an approving way, the intellectual concepts of Nietzsche’s Übermensch, and De Quincey’s act of murder, as a means of showing one’s superiority over others. He too is among the guests at the party, since Brandon, in particular, thinks that he would approve of their “work of art”.

Brandon’s subtle hints about David’s absence indirectly lead to a discussion on the “art of murder”. Brandon appears calm and in control, although when he first speaks to Rupert he is nervously excited and stammering. Phillip, on the other hand, is visibly upset and morose. He does not conceal it well and starts to drink too much. When David’s aunt, Mrs. Atwater, who fancies herself a fortune-teller, tells him that his hands will bring him great fame, she is referring to his skill at the piano, but he appears to think this refers to the notoriety of being a strangler.

Much of the conversation, however, focuses on David and his strange absence, which worries the guests. A suspicious Rupert quizzes a fidgety Phillip about this and about some of the inconsistencies that have been raised in conversation. For example, Phillip vehemently denies ever strangling a chicken at the Shaws’ farm, though Rupert has seen Phillip strangle several. Phillip later complains to Brandon about having had a “rotten evening”, not because of David’s murder, but because of Rupert’s questioning.

As the evening goes on, David’s father and fiancée begin to worry because he has neither arrived nor phoned. Brandon increases the tension by playing matchmaker between Janet and Kenneth. Mrs. Kentley calls, overwrought because she has not heard from David, and Mr. Kentley decides to leave.

He takes with him some books Brandon has given him, tied together with the rope Brandon and Phillip used to strangle his son.

When Rupert goes to leave, Mrs. Wilson accidentally hands him David’s monogrammed hat, further arousing his suspicion. Rupert returns to the apartment a short while after everyone else has departed, pretending that he has left his cigarette case behind. He asks for a drink and then stays to theorize about David’s disappearance.

He is encouraged by Brandon, who hopes Rupert will understand and even applaud them. A drunk Phillip, unable to bear it anymore, throws a glass and accuses Rupert of playing cat-and-mouse games with him and Brandon.

Rupert lifts the lid of the chest and finds the body inside. He is horrified and deeply ashamed, realizing that Brandon and Phillip used his own rhetoric to rationalize murder.

Rupert disavows all his previous talk of superiority and inferiority, then seizes Brandon’s gun and fires several shots out the window to attract attention. As police sirens approach, Rupert pulls up a chair next to the chest and the film ends.

Farley Granger Obituary

Early on in his career, the actor Farley Granger, who has died aged 85, worked with several of the world’s greatest directors, including Alfred Hitchcock on Rope (1948) and Strangers On a Train (1951), Nicholas Ray on They Live By Night (1949) and Luchino Visconti on Senso (1953). Yet Granger failed to sustain the momentum of those years, meandering into television, some stage work and often in different European and American movies.

The reasons were complicated, owing much to his sexuality and an unwillingness to conform to Hollywood pressures, notably from his contract studio, MGM, and Samuel Goldwyn. Granger refused to play the publicity or marrying game common among gay and bisexual stars and turned down roles he considered unsuitable, earning a reputation – in his own words – for being “a naughty boy”.

He was also the victim of bad luck, notably when Howard Hughes, the egomaniacal owner of RKO studios, took against They Live By Night, shelving it for a year before releasing it without fanfare. While his contemporary Charlton Heston had maintained that it was impossible not to launch his own acting career from two Cecil B DeMille movies, Granger had the far more difficult task of springboarding from his Hitchcock films, where the director had been the star.

Granger was born in San Jose, California, and first appeared on a school stage aged five. A dozen years later he was working in theatres around Los Angeles when his dazzling good looks were noticed by a local talent scout. Aged 18 he made his screen debut as a curly-haired Russian soldier in Lewis Milestone’s The North Star (1943).

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Milestone also cast him in the role of a sergeant in The Purple Heart (1944), but by then the real war had caught up with the actor who, following his military service, took a long while to re-establish himself. Ray cast him in the leading role of They Live By Night, as the emotionally unstable crook Bowie, and by the time the film was released, he had appeared in the feeble Enchantment (1948) and the bucolic Roseanna McCoy (1949).

Luckily, he had also been loaned out for the claustrophobic Rope, filmed in 10-minute takes, resulting in an elegantly artificial movie, with the actors even more puppet-like than was usual with Hitchcock. Granger and John Dall were ideally cast as gay students who murder a friend to display a Nietzschean concept of supremacy.

Granger played the highly-strung Phillip, who cracks under the probing of their tutor (James Stewart). The public was less than enthusiastic. The director Jean Renoir scathingly dismissed the film, adding that it was “a film about homosexuals in which they don’t even show the boys kissing”.

Moving on, in 1950 Granger starred in the fast-paced thriller Side Street, directed by Anthony Mann, Edge of Doom and Our Very Own, before being rescued from the routine by Hitchcock, who cast him in another movie with a gay subtext, Strangers On a Train. He took the more conventional role of a handsome tennis champion, Guy Haines, mentally seduced by the unhinged Bruno (Robert Walker).

Bruno obligingly murders the sportsman’s wife, who is holding back Guy’s career and social ambitions. When the killer wants repayment in kind – via the death of his own bullying father – matters go horribly wrong. Granger was bland rather than urbane, perplexed rather than intimidated, and despite charm, good looks and an attractive voice, he found his career not taking off.

Instead, routine fare such as Behave Yourself! (1951) and Small Town Girl (1953) followed. Even the sympathetic Vincente Minnelli made little of the star opposite Leslie Caron in The Story of Three Loves (1953). Granger needed to get out of his contract and was happy when he was loaned out by Goldwyn to star in Visconti’s Senso. He was intriguingly cast as the embittered romantic Franz Mahler, an Austrian soldier who betrays the married woman besotted with him.

She, in turn, betrays not only her country, Italy but also those struggling politically against the invading forces. With dialogue by Tennessee Williams and Paul Bowles, the film took heady flight into a sumptuous period melodrama. It took many months to shoot and Granger relished new freedom in Europe, buying a house in Rome. Despite this, he never worked again in anything comparable to Visconti’s masterpiece.

Returning sporadically to the US, he played in The Naked Street (1955) as a hoodlum taken under the overly protective wing of Anthony Quinn, then had a better role as the murderous roué in Richard Fleischer’s The Girl in the Red Velvet Swing (1955).

He returned to the stage, acting in The Carefree Tree on Broadway in 1955, and touring with The Seagull, Hedda Gabler and She Stoops to Conquer. Television offered the occasional bit of intelligent casting, including the grasping would-be lover in The Heiress (1961). The role had been a triumph for Montgomery Clift in the cinema in 1949 and one could see the rationale behind the new casting. After a decade mainly in the theatre and TV and little-seen movies such as Rogues’ Gallery (1968), Granger returned to a more congenial Europe.

In 1970 he made a western, My Name Is Trinity, and then a complicated spy thriller, The Serpent, where he co-starred with Henry Fonda, Yul Brynner and Dirk Bogarde, all gentlemen of a certain age in search of elusive work. He again worked in American television, in such popular series as Matt Helm, Ellery Queen, The Love Boat, and Murder, She Wrote and also contributed to the documentary The Celluloid Closet (1995), an examination of homosexuality in Hollywood movies.

In 2001 he appeared in his last film, The Next Big Thing, and came to London for his West End stage debut, in a revival of Noël Coward’s once-controversial play Semi-Monde. He later withdrew because of difficulties in remembering his lines. He said that he had become bored with the process of film-making and retired, devoting himself to travel and his greatest love, the theatre, now as a spectator. In 2007, he published a memoir, Include Me Out, co-written with his long-term partner, the producer Robert Calhoun, who died in 2008.

Farley Granger Married

The details about the wife are disclosed we will update you as soon as we get the information.

Farley Granger Find A Grave

Actor. Born Farley Earle Granger, II, the son of a successful automobile dealer, his father suffered financial ruin during the Depression and his family would be forced to move into a small apartment in North Hollywood. While performing in a theater production, he was spotted by a talent scout who brought him to the attention of Samuel Goldwyn, which led to a contract and his debut with a small part in the picture “North Star” (1943).

Following service in the US Navy (where he was stationed in Hawaii) during World War II, Granger resumed his film career with what would be his breakthrough role as the thrill-kill student opposite James Stewart in Hitchcock’s “Rope” (1948). He reunited with Hitchcock for what is perhaps his most memorable role as the tennis pro who is lured into a murder plot by Robert Walker in the suspenseful “Strangers on a Train” (1951).

He would appear in sporadic features throughout the remainder of his career, as he turned to television and the stage. Among his numerous guest TV roles include the programs “Run for Your Life”, “The Love Boat”, “As the World Turns”, and many others. He earned a Daytime Emmy Award nomination for “One Life to Live” in 1977. His Broadway credits include “The Warm Peninsula” (1959 to 1960), “The Crucible” (1964) and “The Glass Menagerie” (1965). He died from natural causes.

Farley Granger  Movies & Tv Shows

Farley Granger  Movies

  • 1943: The North Star played a role as Damian Simonov
  • 1944: The Purple Heart playing a role as Sgt Howard Clinton
  • 1048: The Live By Night  playing a role as Arthur Bowie Bowers
  • 1949: Roseanna McCoy playing a role  as Johnse Hatfield
  • 1950: Our Very Own as Chuck
  • 1951: Strangers on a Train playing a role as Guy Haines
  • 1052: O Henry’s Full House playing a role as Jim (segment ” The Gift of the Magi)
  • 1953: The story of Three Loves playing a role  as Thomas Clayton